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Showing posts from December, 2013

This Blog Has Moved!

Right, so yes, five years ago I moved to github pages, and never bothered to redirect any of these pages there. Now I've moved on from there, and... Finally I am using my real domain, trishagee.com . My blog is now at trishagee.com/blog .  See you there!

YOW

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December disappeared in a rush of vacation and a fleeting tour of Australia.  It's hard to believe that it's the eve of Christmas Eve already, it's almost impossible to feel Christmassy when you're getting sunburnt on a boat and seeing people in swim-suits wearing santa hats.  A mid-winter festival (complete with trees and fake snow) just feels very odd in summer. I cannot take Christmas seriously in this weather YOW!  is a unique conference, in that it's the same agenda in three different cities: Melbourne, Brisbane and Sydney.  It seems to me that this is a great way to attract speakers from a long way away (and everywhere is a long way away from Australia) but make it cost effective - although you have to shuttle the speakers between the cities, you have the speakers for nearly two weeks and get the material three times in the three different locations. I suffered a lot for this conference... As a speaker, it's awesome - not only do you spend the

Spock: Data Driven Testing

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In the last two articles on Spock I've covered mocking and stubbing . And I was pretty sold on Spock just based on that. But for a database driver, there's a killer feature:   Data Driven Testing . All developers have a tendency to think of and test the happy path. Not least of all because that's usually the path in the User Story - "As a customer I want to withdraw money and have the correct amount in my hand". We tend not to ask "what happens if they ask to withdraw money when the cash machine has no cash?" or "what happens when their account balance is zero?". With any luck you'll have a test suite covering your happy paths, and probably at least twice as many grumpy paths. If you're like me, and you like one test to test one thing (and who doesn't?), sometimes your test classes can get quite long as you test various edge cases. Or, much worse (and I've done this too) you use a calculation remarkably like the one y

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